Little ones come home from school with adorable art projects all the time. After art hangs out on the fridge for a while, what do you do with it? We talk to a mom who saves the paper and a mom who archives it using a handy iPhone app. Which option is best for you?

There's nothing as cute as tiny art projects made from your child's handprints and fingerprints. But once you have dozens of hand-print animals around the house, what do you do with all those projects? Some moms choose to keep art stored in boxes while others have taken to archiving it digitally using scanners, photography or even useful iPhone apps.

The paper camp

A scan wouldn't evoke the same feelings I feel when I am holding something my teenager made when he or she was little.

Mom of teens Sherri Kuhn doesn't keep every single thing her kids bring home from school, but she hand-picks special pieces as keepsakes. "My kids each have an under-bed box that is stuffed with that kind of stuff," Kuhn says. "I go through it each year, usually around their birthday and just remember." If you plan on keeping your kids' art, invest in a good box that seals out bugs and moisture. Use boxes that fit well under beds, tucked away on closet shelves or kept up in the attic. Be aware of potential damage from the elements if you keep papers in the garage. Why does Kuhn opt for saving paper instead of going digital? "A scan," she says, "for me, wouldn't evoke the same feelings I feel when I am holding something my teenager made when he or she was little."

The digital camp

I plan on giving each child their own email account, filled with memories of their childhood, on their 18th birthday.

Mom Joanna Stepka has two little ones. Now that her son Jackson is in preschool, she already sees her share of tiny art projects. She uses Artkive, a new app that helps parents digitally archive school art and art projects. "Artkive has streamlined my kids' art record-keeping," says Stepka. Artkive allows parents to snap pictures of school art and projects with the phone's built-in camera. Art is then archived according to child name, grade and date. Parents can add tags and descriptions to each piece. Best of all, with one click, you can share your child's art safely and privately with anyone with an email address. "I send a copy of each piece of art to my parents, grandparents and each child's email addresses," Stepka says. "I plan on giving each child their own email account, filled with memories of their childhood, on their 18th birthday."

What works for you?

When it comes to your child's art, you're the boss. Hang onto every single piece in an archival box, keep digital copies or toss everything in the recycling bin. Don't feel limited by what you think the expectations are. Some moms use kid art to decorate the house while others toss all the art in a scrap bin for paper crafts down the road. If you're not sure if you want to store or digitally archive, try saving one piece a month for the whole year and scanning or photographing the rest. The key is to do what works for you.

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