Having a baby is scary. Having more than one baby at a time can be downright terrifying! Real moms of multiples come forward about what their most daunting fears were about having their twins, triplets, or more... and how those fears were eventually assuaged.

Surviving the pregnancy

Pregnancies involving multiples are often high risk, and getting the babies through that pregnancy topped the list of many parents, especially Mary Beth Reeves, mom to now 6-1/2-year-old quadruplet girls. "I worried first about their survival. In fact, the doctor actually told me that nature takes care of these things and I would probably not take four home. Once I heard the heartbeats, I did everything I could to keep them safe and inside as long as possible."

All those feedings

I had this image of me running around like a chicken with its head cut off while trying to feed one hungry child and the other screaming at the top of her lungs!

Whether bottle or breastfeeding, feeding multiples can be downright chaotic at times. "I didn't know how to handle feeding two babies at one time," admits twin mom Tonya Whitaker. "I had this image of me running around like a chicken with its head cut off while trying to feed one hungry child and the other screaming at the top of her lungs!" Luckily for Whitaker, who also had a 2-year-old son to tend to, her visions did not become reality. "The elder women in my family really helped me adjust by taking care of my son and allowing me to spend more time establishing a feeding and changing pattern that benefited me and the girls."

Finances

Gina now counsels expectant moms on what gear is absolutely necessary and how to get it at the best price.

Gina Lincicum, mother to a 9-year-old son and 7-year-old twin girls, was most concerned about finances, since her husband incurred a major job change before their twins were born. The fear of not being able to afford diapers for multiple children or put food on the table for a larger family can cause a lot of strain on parents. Through her mothers of multiples club, neighborhood yard sales, and her local Freecycle community, Gina was able to obtain much of the gear she needed at little to no cost. "It turns out that there is very little that you need two of for twins," she advises. Gina now counsels expectant moms on what gear is absolutely necessary and how to get it at the best price.

Sleep? What's that?

Taking care of one newborn takes a toll on sleep, but two, three or even four newborns? "To be honest, I worried mostly that I'd never sleep again," admits Helene Gaither, mom to two sets of twins, ages 6 and 8. "With the second set, my biggest fear was how I was going to do this all over again and juggle the big twins while caring for newborn twins. And... confirmation that I would never sleep again."

What ultimately saved my sanity was finding a college girl who would come three nights a week from 11 p.m. - 6 a.m. and do the overnight feedings so that we could get some sleep.

Twin mom Leslye Schumacher ended up enlisting some paid help. "What ultimately saved my sanity was finding a college girl who would come three nights a week from 11 p.m. - 6 a.m. and do the overnight feedings so that we could get some sleep. Once the twins started sleeping through the night at about 12 weeks old, life became manageable again!"

Life goes on

When caring for two or more babies, it's easy to forget that life is still going on outside (or inside) the home while you're wrapped up in multiple babyhood. But there are often other siblings to care for or even businesses to run. Twin dad Dave Morris gave his older daughter a sense of ownership and ensured she didn't feel lost in the shuffle. "We would refer to 'her twins' and that she was 'getting twins.' Additionally, everyone was very good at coming over and going straight to see her for a few minutes before seeing 'her' newborn twins."

Somehow, everything gets done. And sometimes it's better to not even question how.

"One of my biggest fears was how I was going to continue my business and take care of the kids," states entrepreneur and mother of twins Heidi Danos. "I've found that you simply adjust accordingly as time goes by. I have to take advantage of every spare minute I have, whether that be the few hours they are in preschool each week, or after they've finally fallen asleep at night. Somehow, everything gets done. And sometimes it's better to not even question how."

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