Posted: Apr 01, 2014 7:00 AM
 
Some of the uses are obvious: visual note-taking, broadcasting to absent students, lightning-quick research. But there's one hidden feature on Glass that excites me the most for its potential use in education. This particular Glass "Easter egg" could change field trips forever.
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Imagine, if you will, your child being offered the opportunity to see the Grand Canyon with her science teacher. The Great Wall of China in history class. The Louvre for an art class excursion. Your child would probably learn more in one of those outings than in a whole semester of book study. But field trips like these just aren't feasible. The time and expense required to learn abroad isn't available to many; the public school system certainly can't foot the bill.

But the places we can't physically visit, we can virtually tour even from our desks thanks to technology like Google Glass, which is slowly finding its way into classrooms across the country.

It is only a matter of time before students and knowledge-hungry adults will be able to see the wonders of our world without ever setting foot in a plane... and that's just the beginning.

When I picked up my Glass in San Diego, my Glass Guide was excited to show me an "Easter egg:" a function of the software that you'd only find if you were looking for it. After swiping and tapping a specific number of times, a photo of Glass' development team appeared on the screen before me. (Before my right eye, actually.) I turned my head left and the image followed my gaze, panning to the left so that I could see the wall next to the smiling group. I looked up and saw the ceiling above them. It was virtual reality, if just on a visual level. It is only a matter of time before students and knowledge-hungry adults will be able to see the wonders of our world without ever setting foot in a plane... and that's just the beginning.

Another way Glass will be used in a classroom setting is to utilize the Google Hangouts feature to connect with someone elsewhere in the world and see exactly what they're seeing. There's no limit to what we can learn using this kind of technology.

CNN recently asked, "Would you want Google Glass in class?"

Why wouldn't you want teachers to have every opportunity to teach your children in a way that they will retain the information? I know, I know. You and I grew up doing long division by hand, learning cursive and memorizing the Dewey Decimal System, so our kids should have to endure the same torture, right?

If you ask me, it doesn't really matter whether or not you want Google Glass in the classroom. It's here. And all our Google-searching, calculator-using kids are going to have even more awesome tech at their disposal in the coming years.

The landscape of education is changing rapidly, and there's heated debate over whether these changes are for the best. But virtual field trips anywhere in the universe? Admit it: You're just jealous.

Share With us!^ If you had Glass, where would you go for your first virtual field trip? Leave us a comment below.

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