Posted: Jun 25, 2013 11:00 AM
 
After the baby is born, it's natural for moms to want to stay at home. It makes bonding, nursing and the transition of family life easier. Over time, some moms decide they want (or have) to also earn an income. We've talked to a few stay-at-home moms turned work-at-home moms to find out why they made this transition and how it affects their families.

As moms, we tend to make decisions based on what is best for the family. Once babies come into the picture, that usually means quitting our jobs to stay at home. As the kids get older, there comes a point where it's time to decide whether or not to start working again.Isolated baby toys

Working from home provides flexibility for moms because they can care for the kids and also earn an income. In theory, this sounds like no big deal. In practice, however, it's not as easy. Deadlines and due dates have to be managed alongside soccer practice schedules and play dates. Naptime is no longer when the house gets cleaned, it's now time to work. It's a big change for everyone in the house.

To find out more^We've talked to a few stay-at-home moms turned work-at-home moms to find out more about why moms make this transition and how it affects them and their families. Here's what they had to say...

Galit Breen, mom of three, blogger at These Little Waves and freelance writer at allParenting, Moonfrye and The Huffington Post, decided to make the transition because "my youngest, Brody, will start kindergarten in one year. At that point, I could go back to work outside of the home or make a go of things as a writer. I was gifted the time to start slowly and build, so I grasped at it."

About how the change has affected her and her family, Galit said, "like anything else, there have been both good and bad things about starting to work from home while still having young children. The bad parts are hard — I miss 'things.' Class parties and field trips, Sunday afternoons with my family, some play dates and activities during weekdays. But the good parts have been amazing. My kids have blown me [away] with their independence and ability to play together for blocks of time while I work. My husband has wowed me by stepping up and taking the kids to dance and doing the grocery shopping and coming home from work early to give me a bit of working time. I love that my kids see me following my passion and while we do, indeed, have less time together, we focus on making the time that we do have count."

Class parties and field trips, Sunday afternoons with my family, some play dates and activities during weekdays.

Angela Amman, mom of two, blogger at Angela Amman, managing editor at Write on Edge and writer at Just. Be. Enough. and allParenting, said she "always planned on waiting a bit longer before starting to work again, and I knew I wouldn't return to teaching. As writing from home became more of a possibility I decided to actively pursue some opportunities and finally feel like I'm allowed to say I'm working from home and not just writing as a hobby. Writing is a passion for me, and being able to contribute financially while doing something I love is exciting."Isolated clock

About the transition, Angela said, "we're still trying to figure out how to make it work for the family. For a long time I was able to work after the kids' bedtimes, but that's not practical any longer — unless I want to be up until sunrise. Carving out writing time during the day is challenging, and we're working on balancing the time I need with the family schedule we've had for so long."

For a long time I was able to work after the kids' bedtimes, but that's not practical any longer — unless I want to be up until sunrise.



Continue »
12

Topics: