During your first pregnancy, you charted the day-to-day changes in your body and napped before dinner. First trimester exhaustion meant early bedtimes and morning snacks. Being pregnant with a toddler in the house comes with a different set of rules, including how to sync your nap schedules.

Morning sickness on parade

With a little planning, you can help minimize your child's discomfort over your morning sickness.

Running to the bathroom with a toddler in tow adds another layer of misery to first trimester nausea. Keeping curious little people out of the bathroom is a challenge and explaining morning sickness — especially extreme cases like hyperemesis gravidarum — can be both complicated and frustrating. With a little planning, you can help minimize your child's discomfort over your morning sickness, even if you can't do much about your own comfort level. A small basket of special toys can be used to distract your little one when you duck into the bathroom.

Work around aches and pains

During second pregnancies, many women experience physical discomforts.

With your first pregnancy, you could tailor your activities to your body's changes. During second pregnancies, many women experience physical discomfort like round ligament pain or pelvic pressure earlier than they did during their first pregnancies. Since your child may be too young to understand that lifting or carrying may be uncomfortable for you, make a game out of practicing independence. Give yourself extra time to leave the house and encourage your toddler to pull on his own shoes or shower her with praise as she walks down the steps while holding your hand instead of asking to be carried.

Call in reinforcements

Take advantage of your support system.

Take advantage of your support system, whether it comes in the form of grandparents, a group of mom friends or your most trusted babysitter. Arranging play dates or extra outings may seem like a lot of work when you're already feeling exhausted, but enjoying the company of familiar friends will encourage your toddler to venture away from your side. Put up your feet and rest for a few minutes while your child runs, plays and gets ready to nap.

Sleep when the baby sleeps

If you still have a napping child, consider taking a nap yourself.

When your toddler was a newborn, people probably encouraged you to "sleep when the baby sleeps" to help get through the first few months of new-parent exhaustion. As you found a mothering groove, you likely stopped using your baby's naptime as a chance to snooze yourself, but pregnancy may necessitate a return to that habit. First trimester exhaustion can be exacerbated by chasing after an active toddler, so if you still have a napping child, consider taking a nap yourself. After all, just like when your toddler was a newborn, the laundry can be finished when you both wake up refreshed — and now you might even have a little helper to assist you in folding.

More about healthy pregnancies

Exercise throughout your pregnancy
Drink more water during pregnancy
Pregnancy and caffeine restriction

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